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Title:  Japanese photographs of the Meiji period, vol. 2
Work Type:  photograph albums; photographs
Creator:  Tamamura, Kozaburo (b. 1856), Japan, photographer
Date:  ca. 1885-ca. 1895
Description:  Composite souvenir album of 53 hand-colored albumen prints. Studio portraits and views documenting people, daily life, and customs in Japan around the middle of the Meiji period. Images show Japanese Buddhist priests, women and children, blind persons, street vendors, various occupations, samurai, singers and actors, kimonos, shamisens and other musical instruments, teahouses and the tea trade, stores, street scenes, parks, and festivals.
Dimensions:  27 x 35 cm.
Associated Name:  Stillman, E. G. (1884-1949), United States, collector
Mansfield, Howard (1849-1938), United States, former owner
Location:  Subject: Japan
Topics:  portrait photographs; group portraits; Japanese; women; children; Buddhist priests; street vendors; blind persons; occupations; city and town life; tea trade; teahouses; musical instruments; stores; parks; festivals; samurai; entertainers; kimonos; clothing and dress
Note:  General: Includes some photographs by Tamamura Kozaburo. Images measure 22 x 27 cm. or smaller, most with printed captions in English. Photographs removed from album for preservation purposes, 2009; original order retained; original album retained for reference purposes. Typewritten label attached to front cover: Vol. 2. Occupations, pleasures, flowers.
Provenance: Gift of E.G. Stillman to Widener Library, 1948. Brought from Japan in 1898 by Howard Mansfield, V.P. Metropolitan Museum [of Art in New York].
Historical: Ernest Goodrich Stillman, the son of American financier and banker James Stillman, earned his BA from Harvard in 1908 and his MD from Columbia in 1913. He worked at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research from 1915-1949. A generous benefactor of Harvard University, he had many interests, including photography and collecting Japanese art and literature. New York lawyer and art collector Howard Mansfield (d. 1938) served as a trustee and treasurer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for more than 20 years. In 1936 he donated his collection of Japanese art to the museum.
Citation/References: Nagasaki University Library. Metadata database of Japanese old photographs in Bakumatsu-Meiji Periods.
Attribution: Many photographs from early commercial studios in Japan do not include photographer credits. Studios and shops frequently produced albums for the foreign market using the work of various photographers without attribution and without using the original captions or catalog numbers. Also, a photographer's negatives might be acquired and incorporated into another studio's stock. For these reasons and more, it is often difficult to identify the photographer of a 19th century Japanese photograph.
Related Work:  Part of: E.G. Stillman Japanese Collection
Part of: Early Photography of Japan
Related Information:  HOLLIS Catalog record
Repository:  Widener Library
EGS05
KH 1756

 Work 1 of 53  
Title:  Japanese priest
Item Identifier:  57 (studio number)
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  Farsari, Adolfo (1841-1898), photographer
Date:  ca. 1888
Description:  Buddhist priest wearing kesa robe and holding juzu beads.
Dimensions:  24 x 19 cm.
Associated Name:  Stillman, E. G. (1884-1949), United States, collector
Location:  Subject: Japan
Topics:  portrait photographs; clothing and dress; men; robes; Buddhist rosary; Japanese; Buddhist priests
Materials/Techniques:  Hand-colored albumen print mounted on album page.
Note:  General: Title from caption.
Provenance: Gift of E.G. Stillman to Widener Library, 1948.
Historical: Ernest Goodrich Stillman, the son of American financier and banker James Stillman, earned his BA from Harvard in 1908 and his MD from Columbia in 1913. He worked at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research from 1915-1949. A generous benefactor of Harvard University, he had many interests, including photography and collecting Japanese art and literature. Italian adventurer Adolfo Farsari owned the last important Western photography studio in Japan. Born in Italy, he immigrated to the United States in 1863 where he married, served in the Union army, and became an American citizen. Following the death of his second son, he left home and spent the next five years traveling before moving to Japan in 1873. Farsari taught himself photography and opened his own studio in 1885 when he acquired the stock and negatives of Stillfried & Anderson. In 1890, he left Japan and returned to Italy.
Citation/References: Bennett, Terry. Old Japanese Photographs: Collectors' Data Guide. London: Quaritch, 2006.
Related Work:  Part of: E.G. Stillman Japanese Collection
Part of: Early Photography of Japan
Related Information:  From the album: Japanese photographs of the Meiji period, vol. 2, p. 1
HOLLIS Catalog record
Repository:  Widener Library
EGS05.01
KH 1756
Record Identifier: olvgroup12216


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