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Components: 60 works (with 60 images)
 Group
Title:  Nuremberg Trial photograph collection
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945-1946
Description:  Photographs of Nuremberg Trials defendants, judges, and trial activities.
Dimensions:  bulk 28 x 35.3 cm
Topics:  trials; criminals; Nazis; genocide
Materials/Techniques:  gelatin silver process on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 1 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476120?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial courtroom in session

Title:  Court in session at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 22
Description:  Nuremberg Trial prosecutor Major Frank B. Wallis stands at a podium and addresses the court. A diagram outlining the Nazi chain of command hangs on a wall opposite Wallis's podium.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.2 cm.
Associated Name:  Wallis, Frank B. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  lawyers; trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215812-S / Showing of Nazi "Chain of Command" highlights third day of Nuernberg trials. The large chart in the background at left of courtroom was displayed on the afternoon of the third ay [sic.] of the Nuernberg proceedings, showing the position of most of the defendants in the salad [sic.] days of the Nazi hierarchy. At the same session, Major Frank B. Wallis (standing at desk near center) member of trial counsel and trial preparation legal staff, presented further items of the prosecution's case. Defendant Hermann Goering (first in box at left) showed increased interest in the proceedings, but Rudolf Hess, sitting next to the ex-luftwaffe commander, continued his apathetic reading of a novel. Joachim von Ribbentrop is also visible in the defendants box. 11/22/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 2 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168732?height=150&width=150
Herman Goering

Title:  Hermann Göring on the stand at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 March 8
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Herman Göring sits at a witness stand flanked by two military officers in a courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SG 229166 / Herman Goering poses on the stand at the Nuernberg, Germany trials. It is believed that he will take the stand in his own defense next week. 3/8/46
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 3 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168733?height=150&width=150
Dr. Hjalmar Schacht

Title:  Hjalmar Schacht on the stand at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Date:  1945-1949
Description:  Hjalmar Schacht sits behind the witness stand flanked by two military officers in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Schacht, Hjalmar Horace Greeley (1877-1970), subject
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 4 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168734?height=150&width=150
Goering, Dönitz, Hess

Title:  Hermann Göring, Karl Dönitz, and Rudolf Hess at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 26
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendants Göring, Doenitz, and Hess look over a document in a courtroom. Two military guards stand behind them.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Hess, Rudolf (1894-1987), sitter
Dönitz, Karl (1891-1980), sitter
Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: 219803-3 / Before court convenes for a morning session at Nuernberg three defendants have a chat. L to R: Herman Goering, Karl Doenitz and Rudolf Hess. 11/26/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 5 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168735?height=150&width=150
Biddle and Parker

Title:  Francis Biddle and John J. Parker
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 1
Description:  Nuremberg Trials judges Biddle and Parker look over a document.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Parker, John Johnston (1885-1958), sitter
Biddle, Francis (1886-1968), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; judges
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215038-S / American jurists study evidence in preparation for the Nuernberg trials. (L to R) Judge Francis Biddle and Judge John J. Parker, in their office at the Nuernberg courthouse. Germany 11/1/1945
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 6 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168736?height=150&width=150
Kempner and Marx

Title:  Dr. Robert Kempner and Dr. Hans Marx
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 13
Description:  Document in hand and wearing a military uniform, Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Dr. Kempner addresses defense attorney Dr. Marx who is wearing an overcoat and holding his hat.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Marx, Hans (n.d.), sitter
Kempner, Robert M. W. (1899-1993), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 216345 / Dr. Hans Marx, standing with overcoat and hat, represents Julius Streicher, one of the 20 former Nazi leaders to be tried at the war crimes trials before the International Military Tribunal at Nuernberg, Germany. The lawyer is introduced to a roomful of news correspondents assigned to the trial. 11/13/1945 [by Dr. Kempner of the staff of the U.S. Chief of Counsel]
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 7 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168737?height=150&width=150
Fyfe and Jackson

Title:  Sir David Maxwell Fyfe and Justice Robert H. Jackson
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 12
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutors Fyfe and Jackson sit behind a desk in a room in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Jackson, Robert Houghwout (1892-1954), sitter
Fyfe, David Patrick Maxwell (1900 -), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 216350 / Seated at a desk, British and American prosecutors prepare the case against the former Nazi leaders who will be tried for war crimes before the International Military Tribunal in Nuernberg, Germany, on November 20th. They are, left to right, Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, assistant British prosecutor, and Justice Robert H. Jackson, American prosecutor. 11/12/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 8 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168738?height=150&width=150
Volchkov and Nikitchenko

Title:  Judge A.F. Volchkov and Major General Iona T. Nikitchenko
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 1
Description:  Nuremberg Trials judges Volchkov and Nikitchenko sit behind a desk looking at documents in a room in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Nikitchenko, Iona T. (n.d.), sitter
Volchkov, A. F. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; judges
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215041-S / The two USSR judges appointed to the Nuernberg trials do preparatory work at the Nuernberg courthouse. Left to right, Judge A. F. Volchkov and Maj. Gen. Iona T. Nikitchenko, Judge Advocate General of the Red Army. 11/1/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 9 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168739?height=150&width=150
Panel of Nuremberg justices

Title:  A panel of justices and attorneys at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 23
Description:  Seated left to right: Justice Sir Norman Birkett, Lord Justice Sir Geoffrey Lawrence, Col. A.F. Volchkov, Maj. Gen. I.T. Nikitchenko, and Francis Biddle. These men are seated behind a long table in a courtroom at the Nuremberg Trials.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Volchkov, A. F. (n.d.), sitter
Nikitchenko, Iona T. (n.d.), sitter
Biddle, Francis (1886-1968), sitter
Birkett, Norman (1883-1962), sitter
Lawrence, Geoffrey (1880-1971), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers; judges
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215978-S / British judicial representatives go into a legal huddle on the third day of the war crimes trials, Nuernberg, Germany. Justice [Sir Norman] Birkett, alternate judge, stoops over to listen to Lord Justice [Sir Geoffrey] Lawrence, presiding judge from Great Britain. On the left, tuned in to the translations, are [Col.] A.F. Volchoff, alternate judge and Maj. Gen. I.T. Nikitchenko, Judge, both from [Soviet] Russia. Extreme right, [former] attorney general Francis Biddle, Judge from the United States, studies his notes. 11/25/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 10 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168740?height=150&width=150
Albert Kesselring.

Title:  Albert Kesselring
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials witness Kesselring sits at a table in a room, pencil and paper in hand.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kesselring, Albert (1885-1960), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218572-S / Field Marshall Albert Kesselring, German Commander in Italy now held as a witness at Nuernberg. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 11 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168741?height=150&width=150
Opening statement at Nuremberg

Title:  Justice Robert H. Jackson delivers his opening statement at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 22
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Jackson speaks at a podium to the right of several tiered courtroom benches crowded with justices, officials, stenographers, and translators.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Jackson, Robert Houghwout (1892-1954), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 219748 / Justice Robert H. Jackson, standing at right, delivers the prosecutions opening statement at the International Military Tribunal in Nuernberg, Germany. 11/22/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 12 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168742?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial proceedings

Title:  Court in session at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 December 10
Description:  View of the courtroom in session at the Nuremberg Trials. The photograph was taken to document the appearance of defendant Ernst Kaltenbrunner at the proceedings. Kaltenbrunner is seated fifth from the left in the row of defendants.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kaltenbrunner, Ernst (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 222970 / Ernst Kaltenbrunner, former deputy to Gestapo-head Himmler, is the new face among the accused at the war crimes trials, which brings the number to twenty-one. He was absent from the courtroom at the opening due to a cranial hemmorrhage which sent to the hospital. He is in front row fifth man from the left. / Nuernberg, Germany. 12/10/1945
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 13 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168743?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trials defense attorneys

Title:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorneys and news correspondents
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 13
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorneys are introduced to press correspondents by attorney Robert Kempner. United States Senator Claude Pepper sits in a chair on the right.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kempner, Robert M. W. (1899-1993), sitter
Pepper, Claude (1900-), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; journalists; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 216347 / Senator Claude Pepper of Florida, seated in the background on the right, looks on while defense attorneys for forner Nazi leaders to be tried before the International Military Tribunal at Nuernberg, Germany, are introduced to a roomful of news correspondents. (11/13/45) [by Dr. Robert Kempner of Phila. liaison attorney between German defense counsel and the U.S. prosecution.]
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 14 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168744?height=150&width=150
Hans Bernd Gisevius

Title:  Hans Bernd Gisevius
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 April 25
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Gisevius wears headphones while sitting on the witness stand.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Gisevius, Hans Bern (1904-1974), sitter
Topics:  genocide; trials; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 235812 / A closeup of Bernhardt von [crossed out in blue pen, then written: Hans Bernd] Gisevius, former Nazi Gestapo agent, a witness for Wilhelm Frick [and Hjalmar Schacht], one of the defendants on trial at Nuernberg, Germany, as he appeared on the witness stand when he gave testimony against Goering, on the charge that Goering sought to intimidate defense witness Hjalmar Schacht, to prevent him from testifying about the worst deed Goering ever committed. Nuernberg, Germany. 4-25-46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 15 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168745?height=150&width=150
Hans Frank

Title:  Hans Frank
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 April 19
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Frank sits on the witness stand. He wears headphones, and two military officers stand behind him.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Frank, Hans (1900-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 234252 / Hans Frank, Nazi governor general of Poland, one of the defendants on trial for their lives, takes the witness stand on his own behalf, at the trials in Nuernberg, Germany. 4-19-46.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 16 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168746?height=150&width=150
Kraus and Siemers

Title:  Dr. Herbert Kraus and Dr. Walter Siemers
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 March 29
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorneys Kraus and Siemers, both wearing judges's robes, stand behind a podium and microphone.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kraus, Herbert (1884-1965), sitter
Siemers, Walter (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 232470 / Prof. Herbert Kraus of Goettingen, Germany, (left) is defense counsel for Hjalmar Schacht, former president of Reichsbank, at the war crimes trial at Nuernberg, Germany. On the right standing near the mouthpiece is Dr. Walter Siemers of Hamburg, Germany, who is defending former Grand Admiral Erich Raeder, ex-commander in chief of the Germany Navy. 3/29/46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 17 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168747?height=150&width=150
Fyfe and Stahmer

Title:  Sir David Maxwell Fyfe and Dr. Otto Stahmer
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 February 28
Description:  Nuremberg Trials attorneys Fyfe and Stahmer, both wearing headphones, look at papers and confer in a crowded courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Stahmer, Otto (n.d.), sitter
Fyfe, David Patrick Maxwell (1900 -), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 229641 / NUERNBERG TRIALS. Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, chief British prosecutor, and Dr. Otto Stahmer, defense counsel for Herman Goering, discuss material to be used in the defense of the former Reichsnarshal which will be satisfactory to the British Prosecution Staff. / Germany. 2/28/46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 18 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168748?height=150&width=150
Phillimore

Title:  Colonel H. J. Phillimore
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 15
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Phillimore wears a military uniform and stands at a podium wearing headphones in a crowded courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Phillimore, H. J. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 227728 / Col. H. Phillimore, of the British Army, a member of the International Military Tribunal [crossed out in blue pen, written: prosecuting staff] which is trying Admiral Karl Doenitz as a war criminal, questions witness Moehle. Moehle is not seen in picture. Nuerneberg, Germany. 1/15/46
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 19 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168749?height=150&width=150
Kranzbühler

Title:  Dr. Otto Kranzbühler
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 14
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorney Kranzbühler wears a military uniform and stands behind a podium in a crowded courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kranzbühler, Otto (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 227730 / Doctor Otto Kranzbuehler, at speaker's stand, questions witness Oberleutnant Peter Josef Heisig, who is not seen in the picture, at a session of the International Military Tribunal, trying war crimes criminals. Dr. Kranzbuehler is attorney for Admiral Karl Doenitz, charged with war crimes. Nuernberg, Germany. 1/14/46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 20 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168750?height=150&width=150
William Baldwin

Title:  Lieutenant Colonel William Howard Baldwin
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 10
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Baldwin stands behind a podium in a crowded courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Baldwin, William Howard (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 226367 / Lt. Col. William Howard Baldwin of Detroit, Mich., assistant U.S. prosecutor in charge of the individual case against Hans Frank, former governor general of German occupied Poland, sums up the evidence against the defendant. Nuernberg, Germany. 1-10-46.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 21 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168751?height=150&width=150
Griffith-Jones and Marx

Title:  Lieutenant Colonel J. M. G. Griffith-Jones and Dr. Hans Marx
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 10
Description:  Nuremberg Trials attorneys Griffith-Jones and Marx both stand behind a podium in a crowded courtroom. Griffith-Jones wears a suit, while Marx wears judge's robes and headphones.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Marx, Hans (n.d.), sitter
Griffith-Jones, J. M. G. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 226366 / Lt. Col. M. Griffith-Jones, British prosecutor against Julius Streicher, German publisher of the anti-Jewish newspaper "Der Stuermer" sums up the evidence against the defendant. The prosecutor, in civilian clothes, charges defendant of being an accessory to murder on a scale never before known to mankind. Dr. Hans Marx, defense counsel for Streicher at the International Military Tribunal in Nuernberg, Germany, thumbs through papers looking for the origin of pictures used in the photographic Nuernberg paper published weekly. 1-10-46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 22 of 60    
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Walter Brudno

Title:  Walter W. Brudno
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 9
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Brudno wears a military uniform and stands behind a podium in a courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Brudno, Walter W. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 225198 / Walter W. Brudno, former private first class in U.S. Army, as a member of the prosecutor's staff takes the speaker's stand. He is addressing a court session at the war crimes trial in Nuernberg, Germany. Mr. Brudno has had a varied legal and miliatary background, serving recently with the U.S. strategic bombing survey in London and Germany. 1/9/46
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 23 of 60    
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Alfred Thoma

Title:  Dr. Alfred Thoma
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 8
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorney Thoma wears a judge's robe and stands behind a podium in a packed courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Thoma, Alfred (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 225193 / Alfred Thoma, attorney for Alfred Rosenberg, one of the defendants at the war crimes trial of former Nazi leaders, addresses the international military tribunal at Nuernberg, Germany. 1/8/46
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 24 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168754?height=150&width=150
Chaplain Henry Gereke

Title:  U.S. Army Chaplain Captain Henry A. Gereke
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 22
Description:  Gereke, his back to the camera, addresses a crowded courtroom in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Gereke, Henry A. (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; ministers (pastors)
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 220246 / Chaplain (Capt.) Henry A. Gereke, U.S. Army, St. Louis, Mo., reads a short sermon to the audience celebrating Thanksgiving day in the court room of the Palace of Justice, Nuernberg, Germany. The audience consisted mostly of Allied representatives to the International military tribunal, which included Francis Biddle, Robert Jackson, and Justice Birkett, representing the U.S. during the trials. 11-22-45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 25 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1180839?height=150&width=150
Thomas Dodd

Title:  United States assistant prosecutor Thomas J. Dodd
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 December 14
Description:  Dodd stands behind a podium in a courtroom at the Nuremberg Trials.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Dodd, Thomas J. (1907-1971), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 222071 / Thomas J. Dodd (standing), assistant U.S. prosecutor presents his case on concentration camps to the International Military Tribunal at Nuernberg, Germany. 12/14/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 26 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168755?height=150&width=150
Otto Ohlendorf

Title:  Otto Ohlendorf
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 January 3
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Ohlendorf stands in the witness stand wearing headphones in a courtroom. He and the other assembled people in the courtroom look at a Nazi organizational chart projected on a screen.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Ohlendorf, Otto (1907-1951), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 227833 / O. Ohlendorf (standing in witness box at right) former Major General of Police and Chief of Security Police and Security Service at the Hqs. of Reich leader SS, answers questions put to him by a member of the prosecution at the Nuernberg trials in Germany. 1/3/45
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 27 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168756?height=150&width=150
Ernst Kaltenbrunner

Title:  Ernst Kaltenbrunner
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 December 21
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Kaltenbrunner sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Kaltenbrunner, Ernst (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 225010 / Ernst Kaltenbrunner, former SS chief for Austria [and of RSHA], in his cell at the Nuernberg jail. Kaltenbrunner was recently released from the jail hospital, where he was being treated for hemorrhages. He is now considered to be sufficiently recovered to stand trial as a war criminal. Germany. 12/21/45
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 28 of 60    
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Rudolf Hess

Title:  Rudolf Hess
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Book in hand, Nuremberg Trials defendant Rudolf Hess sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Hess, Rudolf (1894-1987), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218392-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 13) (See Lead Caption) / Rudolf Hess, Nuernberg defendant, puts in much of his cell time reading. His current interest is the book, "Jugend," by Ernest Claes. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 29 of 60    
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Walter Funk

Title:  Walter Funk
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Funk sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Funk, Walter Emanuel (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218391-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 12) (See lead Caption) / Walter Funk, Nuernberg defendant, awaits summoning for the day's session of the war crimes trials in his cell at the Nuernberg city jail. Nuernberg, Germany 11/24/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 30 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168759?height=150&width=150
Wilhelm Frick

Title:  Wilhelm Frick
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 23
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Frick sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Frick, Wilhelm (1877-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218390-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 11) (See Lead Caption) Wilhelm Frick, defendant in the Nuernberg crimes trials, buttons his jacket as he sits in his cell in the Nuernberg prison. Nuernberg, Germany 11/23/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 31 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168760?height=150&width=150
Konstantin von Neurath

Title:  Konstantin von Neurath
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Neurath sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Neurath, Konstantin Hermann Karl Freiherr von (1873-1956), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218389-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 10) (See Lead Caption) Constantin Von Neurath plays with his glasses in his cell at the city jail in Nuernberg, Germany. The former German leaders are being held there by the International Military Tribunal as defendants in the war crimes trials. 11/24/45.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 32 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168761?height=150&width=150
Joachim von Ribbentrop

Title:  Joachim von Ribbentrop
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 26
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Ribbentrop sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Ribbentrop, Joachim von (1893-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218396-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 17) (See Lead Caption) Joachim von Ribbentrop, defendant at the war crimes trials, takes time out from his writing in his cell at the city jail in Nuernberg, Germany. 11/26/45
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 33 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168762?height=150&width=150
Franz von Papen

Title:  Franz von Papen
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 23
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Papen sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Papen, Franz von (1879-1969), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218395-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 16) (See Lead Caption) Franz von Papen, former German Foreign Minister, shown in his cell in the Nuernberg prison. Nuernberg, Germany 11/23/45
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 34 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168763?height=150&width=150
Julius Streicher

Title:  Julius Streicher
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Streicher sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Streicher, Julius (1885-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218394-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 15) (See Lead Caption) Julius Streicher, Nuernberg defendant, at his cell writing desk in the Nuernberg city jail. Nuernberg, Germany 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 35 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168764?height=150&width=150
Albert Speer

Title:  Albert Speer
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Speer works at a typewriter on a table in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Speer, Albert (1905-1981), Germany, sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218398-S / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 19) (See Lead Caption) Albert Speer, Nuernberg defendant, types a letter in his cell at the city jail. The defendants are permitted to write one letter and two postcards per week. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 36 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168765?height=150&width=150
Hans Fritzsche

Title:  Hans Fritzsche
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 26
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Fritzsche sits on his bed in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Fritzsche, Hans (1900-1953), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218397-S A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 18) (See Lead Caption) Hans Fritzsche, defendant at the war crimes trials, sits on his bunk in the city jail. Nuernberg, Germany 11/26/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 37 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168766?height=150&width=150
Alfred Jodl

Title:  Alfred Jodl
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 23
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Jodl sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Jodl, Alfred (1890-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218399-S / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 20) (See Lead Caption) Alfred Jodl, who surrendered Germany to the Allies, shown in his cell in the Nuernberg prison, where he is on trial with other Nazi leaders. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/23/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 38 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168767?height=150&width=150
Karl Dönitz

Title:  Karl Dönitz
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Dönitz sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Dönitz, Karl (1891-1980), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218388-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 9) (See Lead Caption) Karl Doenitz smiles pleasantly for the photographer in his cell in the city jail of Nuernberg, Germany. Former German leaders, defendants at the war crimes trials, are being held there by the International Military Tribunal. 11/24/45.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 39 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168768?height=150&width=150
Alfred Rosenberg

Title:  Alfred Rosenberg
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Rosenberg sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Rosenberg, Alfred (1893-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218387-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 8) (See Lead Caption) Alfred Rosenberg, Nuernberg defendant, sitting in his cell bunk at the Nuernberg city jail. Germany, 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 40 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168769?height=150&width=150
Fritz Sauckel

Title:  Fritz Sauckel
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Fritz Sauckel looks at photographs in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Sauckel, Fritz (1894-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218386-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 7) (See Lead Caption) Fritz Sauckel, Nuernberg defendant, looks over pictures of his family in his cell in the Nuernberg city jail. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 41 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168770?height=150&width=150
Wilhelm Keitel

Title:  Wilhelm Keitel
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Keitel sits in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Keitel, Wilhelm (1882-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218385-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 6) (See Lead Caption) Wilhelm Keitel, defendant at the war crimes trials, in his cell in the city jail, Nuernberg, Germany. The former German leaders are being held there by the International Military Tribunal. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 42 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168771?height=150&width=150
Baldur von Schirach

Title:  Baldur von Schirach
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 26
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Schirach reads a book in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Schirach, Baldur von (1907-1974), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218384-5 / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 5) (See Lead Caption) Baldur von Schirach, defendant at the war crimes trials, on his bunk reading, in his cell in the city jail at Nuernberg, Germany. 11/26/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 43 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168772?height=150&width=150
Hans Frank

Title:  Hans Frank
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Frank looks over books and papers at a table in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Frank, Hans (1900-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218383-S / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 4) (See Lead Caption) Hans Frank, Nuernberg defendant, reads at his table in city jail cell. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 44 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168773?height=150&width=150
Arthur Seyss-Inquart

Title:  Arthur Seyss-Inquart
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Seyss-Inquart sits at a table in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Seyss-Inquart, Arthur (1892-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218382-S / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 3) (See Lead Caption) Artur Seyss-Inquart, Nuernberg defendant, sits at his writing desk in his cell at Nuernberg city jail. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 45 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168774?height=150&width=150
Hjalmar Schacht

Title:  Hjalmar Schacht
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Schacht writes on paper at a desk in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Schacht, Hjalmar Horace Greeley (1877-1970), subject
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218381-S / A SERIES OF TWENTY PICTURES (Picture No. 2) (See Lead Caption) Hjalmar Schacht, Nuernberg defendant, writes a letter in city jail cell at Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 46 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168775?height=150&width=150
Erich Raeder

Title:  Erich Raeder
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Raeder eats from a cup in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Raeder, Erich (1876-1960), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218380-S / MASTER CAPTION ON TWENTY PICTURE SERIES (Photo No. 1) Stone-and-iron cells in the ancient Nuernberg jail are the homes today of the men who once ruled Europe. Twenty are on trial before the International Military Tribunal; the others, smaller fry, are now held as witnesses of the deeds of their superiors and may stand trial later. Here is a pictorial story by Signal Corps cameramen of how the Nazi leaders live in captivity. Each defendant is watched constantly by a special guard; witnesses have slighly less surveillance. Witnesses and defendants, quartered in separate wings of the buidling, eat the same food, prepared by German prisoners and served in G.I. mess kits; their only utensil is a spoon. Former rank is still observed among military and naval men, but the field marshals still stand at attention when asking an American Pfc for writing paper. The utmost precautions are taken to prevent other defendants from following Robert Ley to death by suicide. / Erich Raeder, Nuernberg defendant, eats his cell fare at the city jail in Nuernberg. Each of the defendants is limited in dining gear to a spoon, canteen cup without handle, and meat can. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 47 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168776?height=150&width=150
Dr. Stahmer addresses the court

Title:  Dr. Otto Stahmer addresses the court at the Nuremberg Trials
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 March 8
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defense attorney Stahmer speaks from a podium in the middle of a crowded courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Stahmer, Otto (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC229165 / Dr. Stahmer, defense counsel for Goering, addresses the court during the International Military Tribunal trials at Nuernberg, Germany. 3/8/46
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 48 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1168777?height=150&width=150
Warren Farr

Title:  United States Army Major Warren Farr addresses the court at Nuremberg
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 December 23
Description:  Nuremberg Trials prosecutor Farr speaks from a podium in a courtroom.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Farr, Warren (n.d.), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 224067 / Maj. Warren Farr, U.S. Army, member of the staff of the Office of the Chief Counsel at the International Military Tribunal, Nuernberg, Germany, gives evidence against the SS. This is the first time he has appeared at the trial. Nuernberg, Germany. 12/23/45
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 49 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1182360?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trials opening session

Title:  Nuremberg Trials opening session
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 20
Description:  Overhead courtroom view of the opening session of the Nuremberg Trials.
Dimensions:  35.3 x 28 cm
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215199-S / Trial of Hitler's henchmen opens at Nuernberg. A packed courtroom at the Palace of Justice hears prosecution commence reading of indictment. View shows press section (lower tier) and spectators' gallery (upper tier) in background. Members of the prosecution sit at tables in front of press section. Part of interpreters' section is included at extreme left, and standing in front of this member of prosecution reads indictment. In box in foreground, at right in front of U.S. Military guards, sit the twenty defendants, and at tables in front of them the attorneys for the defense. Nuernberg, Germany. 11/20/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 50 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1182361?height=150&width=150
Herman Göring

Title:  Hermann Göring
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 December 21
Description:  Nuremberg Trials defendant Göring reads a book while lying on a bed in his jail cell in Nuremberg, Germany.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Associated Name:  Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218393-S / A SERIES OF 20 PICTURES (Picture No. 14) (See Lead Caption) Herman Goering, Nuernberg defendant, lies on his bunk in the city jail, Nuernberg, Germany, and reads the book, "Das Gewonnene Leben," by Joseph Michels. On his writing table are pictures of his family which he objected to being photographed. 12/21/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 51 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1182362?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg prison cell block

Title:  Prisoners' cell block in Nuremberg jail
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 24
Description:  Interior view of jail facility in Nuremberg, Germany. Guards stand watch outside each cell door.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.3 cm
Topics:  interior views; Nazis; criminals; jails; guards
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218565-S / /Main section of prisoners' cell block in the Nuernberg jail. Cells occupied by Goering and Hess are at extreme right. Each defendant is watched by an individual guard who is constantly posted at his door. 11/24/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Copyright:  Stamp on reverse of photograph reads: Signal Corps Photo. Please credit. Released by authority of the Bureau of Public Relations or by Theatre Press Censor.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 52 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476116?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial defendants

Title:  Nuremberg Trial defendants converse in the defendants' galley
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 23
Description:  Overhead view of Nuremberg Trial defendants Wilhelm Keitel and Francis Von Papen conversing with each other in the defendants' galley. Also shown are Alfred Rosenberg, Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess, Joachim Von Ribbentrop, Hans Frank, and Karl Doenitz.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.2 cm.
Associated Name:  Keitel, Wilhelm (1882-1946), sitter
Papen, Franz von (1879-1969), sitter
Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Hess, Rudolf (1894-1987), sitter
Ribbentrop, Joachim von (1893-1946), sitter
Rosenberg, Alfred (1893-1946), sitter
Frank, Hans (1900-1946), sitter
Dönitz, Karl (1891-1980), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218563-S / Wilhelm Keitel (left) and Franz Von Papen have a discussion during a 15-minute recess in court. Alfred Rosenberg, rubbing his chin, looks on. Other defendants shown are Goering, Hess, Von Ribbentrop, Keitel, Rosenberg, Frank. Rear row: Doenitz, Von Soh. Nuernberg, Germany. 1/23/45.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 53 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476117?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Palace of Justice

Title:  Nuremberg Palace of Justice
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 20
Description:  Aerial view of the Nuremberg Palace of Justice, courthouse, and prison buildings.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.2 cm.
Topics:  prisons; palaces; Nazis; courthouses
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215209-S / Scene of International Military Tribunal at Nuernberg Germany. Air view shows the Nuernberg Palace of Justice (large building in center) and at right the courthouse in which the trials of Hitler's ex-chiefs are being conducted. In rear of the Palace and surrounded by a wall can be seen the prison area and buildings which have housed the war crime defendants for the past seven months. / Nuernberg, Germany. 11/20/45.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 54 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476118?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial judges

Title:  Nuremberg Trial judges
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945
Description:  View of the judges' panel during a session of the Nuremberg Trial.
Dimensions:  21 x 25.5 cm.
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; judges
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 55 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476119?height=150&width=150
Ralph G. Albrecht

Title:  Ralph G. Albrecht
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 January 8
Description:  Nuremberg Trial prosecutor Albrecht addresses the court. His two assistants, Mary Catherine Roche and John Auchincloss, sit to his right.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.4 cm.
Associated Name:  Roche, Mary Catherine (n.d.), sitter
Auchincloss, John (n.d.), sitter
Albrecht, Ralph Gerhart (1896 -), sitter
Topics:  lawyers; trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 225194 / Ralph C. Albrecht, a member of the [U.S.] prosecution staff at the war crimes trial at Nuernberg, Germany, addresses the court. A member of the board of review, he presents evidence against [Göring and other] individual Nazi defendants. Seated at his right are two assistants: Miss Mary Catherine Roche of Kansas City, Mo., and Capt. John Auchincloss of New York City. Albrecht was formerly attached to the embassy at London. 1/8/46.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 56 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476121?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial judges

Title:  Nuremberg Trial judges
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945
Description:  Nuremberg Trial judges sit on the judges' dias.
Dimensions:  20.5 x 25.3 cm.
Topics:  trials; Nazis; judges
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 57 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476122?height=150&width=150
Hermann Göring

Title:  Hermann Göring
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 26
Description:  Nuremberg Trial defendant Göring enters the courtroom. A military police officer stands behind him.
Dimensions:  35 x 27.2 cm.
Associated Name:  Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 218564-S / Hermann Goering enters the courtroom in the Palace of Justice for the morning session of the trial. Prisoners come up from the jail in this elevator but Goering, because of his size, has to make a slight turn to negotiate the narrow doorway. 11/26/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 58 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476123?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial translators

Title:  Nuremberg Trial translators
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1946 April 29
Description:  View of male and female translators at the Nuremberg Trial. The translators sit at long tables and wear headphones.
Dimensions:  27.8 x 35.3 cm.
Topics:  trials; translators; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 232476 / In this section of the courtoom at the war crimes trials in Nuernberg, Germany, translators translate the testimony of speakers and witnesses into four languages. 4/29/46
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 59 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476124?height=150&width=150
Nuremberg Trial defendants

Title:  Nuremberg Trial defendants
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 22
Description:  Nuremberg Trial defendants sit in two rows in the defendants' gallery. Front row, left to right: Hermann Goering, Joachim von Ribbentrop, Wilhelm Keitel, and Alfred Rosenberg. Back row, left to right: Karl Doenitz, Erich Raeder, Baldur von Schirach, Fritz Sauckel, and Alfred Jodl.
Dimensions:  28 x 35.4 cm.
Associated Name:  Göring, Hermann (1893-1946), Germany, sitter
Ribbentrop, Joachim von (1893-1946), sitter
Keitel, Wilhelm (1882-1946), sitter
Rosenberg, Alfred (1893-1946), sitter
Dönitz, Karl (1891-1980), sitter
Raeder, Erich (1876-1960), sitter
Schirach, Baldur von (1907-1974), sitter
Sauckel, Fritz (1894-1946), sitter
Jodl, Alfred (1890-1946), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215210-S / Nazi defendants in the Nuernberg War Crimes Trials stare intently at a chart of the party organization introduced in the third day of the trial. Hermann Goering, left, listens to testimoney via earphones. Rudolph Hess, who usually sits between Goering and Ribbentrop, is missing in this photo. He had been complaining previously of severe stomach cramps and was given medical treatment outside the courtroom. Other defendants shown, l. to r. in front row: Keitel, Rosenberg. Back row: Donitz [sic.], Raeder, Schirach, Sauckel, and Jodl. 11/22/45
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library

 Work 60 of 60    
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HLS.Libr:1476125?height=150&width=150
Ralph G. Albrecht

Title:  Ralph G. Albrecht
Work Type:  photographs
Creator:  United States Army Signal Corps (n.d.), photographer
Date:  1945 November 22
Description:  Nuremberg Trial prosecutor Albrecht addresses the court at Nuremberg.
Dimensions:  27.8 x 25.5 cm.
Associated Name:  Albrecht, Ralph Gerhart (1896 -), sitter
Topics:  trials; genocide; Nazis; criminals; lawyers
Materials/Techniques:  photography on paper
Note:  Inscription: News service caption on reverse of photograph reads: SC 215753 / Ralph G. Albrecht, [U.S.] prosecution attorney at the war crimes trial of former Nazi leaders at Nuernberg, Germany, addresses one of the court sessions. By use of a chart, which he and others are facing, he explains to the International Military Tribunal the Nazi party organization. 11/22/45.
Historical: The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held to prosecute members of the political, military, and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and conspiracy. Held at the Nuremberg Palace of Justice in Nuremberg, Germany from October 18, 1945 to October 1, 1946, the first and best known of these trials was the International Military Tribunal (IMT). Twenty-two of the most prominent captured Nazi leaders were tried before judges representing four of the Allied powers - Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Twelve of those convicted were sentenced to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment and four to prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years. The Tribunal acquitted three of the defendants. The second set of trials of lesser war criminals was conducted under Control Council Law No. 10 at the U.S. Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMT), among them included the Doctors' Trial and the Judges' Trial.
General: Forms part of the Nuremberg Trial photograph collection.
Repository:  Harvard Law School Library
Record Identifier: olvgroup12379

Record 1 of 1 

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